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Dealing with Tooth Pain

Tooth pain can be terrible as you may know. This can be from tooth decay, gum health problems, gum recession, or even a naturally thin layer of enamel, but there are a few things that are quick fixes for sudden onset of sensitivity or pain when you can't get to your dentist immediately.


  1.  OTC Pain relievers: Over the counter pain relievers, such as Advil, Motrin, or Tylenol, can be used to treat minor tooth pain or sensitivity. They are fairly quick acting usually taking effect within about 30 minutes. For tooth pain Dr. Pan usually recommends Ibuprofen(Advil) because it is anti-inflammatory as well as a pain killer. This helps just in case the pain is caused by inflammation(swelling) of either the gums or inside of the tooth.
  2. Orajel: Orajel or other numbing agents are great for numbing the area temporarily until you can see your doctor. There are a number of similar products on the market, they work all basically the same way. A holistic alternative would be Clove Oil.
  3. Ice: Ice is a great numbing agent, but it only works for a short time. You can put the ice directly on the affected tooth, or on the outside of the cheek. Usually alternate with the ice on and off every 15 minutes or so. 
  4. Sensodyne: For tooth sensitivity, Sensodyne works wonders. If you have a single area you can apply Sensodyne or another high fluoride toothpaste to the area for 5 minutes and it should help quite a bit.
These quick fixes can be very useful, but please remember that the only way you can actually keep your teeth and gums healthy is with a visit to your friendly neighborhood dentist. They can diagnose the problem and give treatment options to permanently fix the problem. If you can't get in the same day, make sure to keep the area clean. Your dentist may also be able to give alternative advice to you depending on your dental and medical history and treatment plan

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